Uggh, I hate to ask for help

Movies Plus just reached our goal of 100,000 subscribers, and I plan to add more and more great content, without commercial adverts.

How can I do it?

With your help.  Please send whatever you can afford to gift/donate to me via the Paypal service.  paypal-print(If you don’t like using Paypal, then use your favorite service and my webmail address.)

Whatever you donate or gift me, it all goes into Movies Plus.  5 bucks…$50…whatever you send will be greatly appreciated by me. AND if you like, comment here or via the PayPal/email, and I can add your name to our list of supporters here on this blog and/or on MoviesPlus.  Thank you.

To send money via PayPal to my webmail (DeanLach@yahoo.com) it’s pretty simple, or click the donate button below and it will be an easy process too.

Thank you,

Dean Lachiusa, curator for Movies Plus.

paypal.me/MoviesPlus

movies-plus

Copyright is free speech

05-02-16 From CreativeFuture.org

By Robin Sax

This article originally appeared on Psychology Today.

I am a lawyer and I love movies.  You may be thinking, “Of course. That makes sense – what else does an attorney do to unwind?” While I do love zoning out watching other people’s lives unfold via movies, these two parts of my life have become connected in a manner I never would have imagined just a few years ago.

Complex conversations about the value of movies (and other creative works) in the digital age are rendered even more complicated when arguments arise over copyright and free speech.

Wait…

Did I just put those two words in the same sentence? I hesitate to write “copyright” and “free speech” too close together for fear that I might unwittingly contribute to the work of those who attempt to confuse the two.

First, let’s get this out of the way: Piracy is not free speech. I repeat PIRACY is not free speech. As a matter of fact, piracy, plainly speaking, is illegal. It is a crime. Therefore, attempts to eliminate the for-profit digital theft of creative works is not an attack on free speech; it is prudent crime prevention.

When I first heard about CreativeFuture, I was inspired by the organization’s efforts to fend off the widespread theft of creative work via the internet. But I was equally compelled by their mission to combat the notion that this effort was in some way anti-technology, or even more far-fetched, anti-free speech.

These issues – and others – convinced me to become a member of CreativeFuture’s Leadership Committee. Part of my own mission is to help clear up some of the misinformation that, ironically, tends to proliferate best on the internet, where speech is so free that fact and fantasy commingle with an elegance that can render reality indistinguishable from opinion.

This brings me to another blunt fact: Those who want you to believe that the fight against piracy impinges on the right to free speech are doing so on purpose.

Some organizations, such as the Google-supported Electronic Frontier Foundation, take every opportunity to defend piracy at all costs and call any attempts to protect copyright a threat to free speech – even when those attempts include voluntary agreements between trusted stakeholders.

It is no secret that Google treats copyright as a nuisance. Time and again, the tech monolith lobbies Washington and foreign governments to water down existing law or to block any new initiatives designed to help curb rampant digital theft of copyrighted works.

They also criticize (directly and through organizations they underwrite) the various voluntary industry initiatives that can help take the profit out of piracy.

Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution was drafted with the intention to “…promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” This applies as much to an app as it does to a song. If this sounds like an assault on free speech, you need to get your head out of your (patented) virtual reality helmet.

The U.S. Supreme Court has written: “It should not be forgotten that the Framers intended copyright itself to be an engine of free expression.” (Harper & Row Publishers, Inc. v. Nation Enterprises, 471 U.S. 539, 1985.) In the same decision, the Court stated: “…copyright supplies the economic incentive to create and disseminate ideas.”

Somehow, groups like the EFF always ignore the essential idea/expression distinction inherent in copyright law. The whole purpose of the First Amendment is to protect the ability to convey ideas no matter how objectionable those ideas may be to government or society. The First Amendment isn’t about trying to guarantee people’s ability to copy the particular fixed, creative expression of others. What free speech interests are protected or maintained by the wholesale infringement of full copyrighted works (e.g., piracy)?

We live in exciting times. The digital age has promised us a virtual utopia where information is freely available to all. Yes, there are bad actors that stifle free speech online and governments that censor the internet to eliminate thought or action that undermines regimes. Activism is noble and needed, especially in times of great change, to act as a check against overreach and injustice. But activists become victims if they are armed with misinformation. And make no mistake about it – calling the protection of copyrighted works a threat to free speech is misinformation.

If you agree with me and appreciate this argument, feel free to steal it. Share it on your preferred social media channels and spread the word. As its author, I grant you permission. See? That wasn’t so difficult, now was it?

The FB commentary followed:

Liza Moon

Liza Moon may i quote you on that? and if so. as owner of an often pirated property ( google the word “daredoll”, – we are the fully clothed options – the current pirate on spankbang sells our work for higher prices than we do?

Like · Reply · 2 · May 2 at 8:49pm

 

Dean Lach
3 Replies
Ted Folke

Ted Folke When Hollywood and the music industry have been robbing artists for decades, this strikes me as a bit disingenous. American copyright laws are out of date – please see Lawrence Lessig for more!:)

Like · Reply · 1 · 22 hrs

 

Jonathan Boose

Jonathan Boose Lessig is a tool of Big Tech, which has been doing more to rob artists than Hollywood or the Music Industry ever did.

Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs

 

John Kawakami

John Kawakami Copyright is increasingly obsolete because the technology of speech has changed. With computers, you make perfect digital copies. (It’s harder to make them imperfect!) With the internet, you have the ability to track all downloads, of a work, and with decryption or digital rights management, the ability track all uses of a work.

On the one side, you have a space where intellectual property can’t really exist – it’s a property that quickly becomes a public good, part of a commons.

On the other side, you have a space where intellectual property has more “private-property-like” qualities than it ever did when it was published as books or analog recordings. It’s actually invading your privacy; it’s property that can probe into your private life more than the government can (unless they get permission from the courts). Intellectual property becomes a kind of wedge that can drive privacy-invading contracts into your life.

There are different ways around this polarization. CC is one way – it preserves copyright by adapting it to the new reality of perfect digital copies and the internet. (And, Lessig is not a tool – he’s a moderate liberal reformer.) DRM with extensive “sharing” features is another way, because it incorporates “internet-like” features into the privatized surveillance system. This is in the tradition of neoliberal privatization of public space, analogous to things like shopping malls.

 

Mark Grady

Mark Grady John, are you kidding me? Why shouldn’t someone who spends weeks or years working on a book or film have rights associated with that work? This “public good” argument is a silly one. It reminds me of the people who want to legalize pot, so they can use it. There is only one reason people are fighting intellectual property laws – because they want something for nothing.

Like · Reply · 1 · 17 hrs · Edited

 

John Kawakami

John Kawakami I’m not advocating for piracy. I’m just saying the world has changed fundamentally and we need to work with it. My general feeling is that the privatized spaces need some regulations to protect privacy because drm is totally invasive. I think they ineSee More

Like · Reply · 12 hrs · Edited

 

Dean Lach

Dean Lach Mark Grady right on

Dean Lach
Dean LachUggh, regarding hollywood robbing artists, etc etc, this is the kind of rational that we’re talking about. Really, if we all take the law in our own hands, and use subjecture to justify theft, then were will we be? In mean, I love the idea of a Star Trek dystopian future wherein we don’t apply ownership to stuff…but it’s not time yet — the Universe isn’t ready.
=Dean with the “permission of CreativeFuture.org

Metro Film Festival accepting Submissions

March 31, 2016.
Dean Lachiusa
Curator and Developer of Broadcast Channels for the Metro Film Festival.
INTRODUCTION TO “CONNECTED TV” CHANNELS OPERATED BY METRO FILM FESTIVAL
Dean Lachiusa, curator for the Metro Film Festival publishes content on Roku, Fire TV, FLIPPS, SPBTV and other Smart TV platforms.  Streaming Indie produced Film, Television, and Webisode videos augment the Metro Film Festival’s efforts, and hopefully yours.
Right now, we have free opportunities on our latest Amazon Fire TV channel called Movies Plus.  If you’re not familiar with Fire TV, it’s a “set top box” that connects to your Television and utilizes your Internet connection to broadcast programming on your TV.  Movies Plus is much like the Networks you’re familiar with.  We have much the same quality as Crackle, USA, Encore, etc.  The difference is, we’re not controlled by Hollywood — our content is Indie made.  Movies Plus officially opened it’s doors to Indie Filmmakers January 2016, and since then over 10,000 Amazon Fire TV owners have Subscribed to us.  We’re growing day by day.

Movies Plus is the only Broadcaster that allows you to control the amount of exposure for your movie or television program, and there’s no binding contract.

I’m sure you’re interested in seeing the channel with your own two-eyes.  Currently, if you have a Fire TV device, you may add Movies Plus for free via the Amazon store.  If you don’t have Fire TV, an alternative way to watch the channel is on certain Android Browsers, but please be aware that the Channel is not designed (yet) for Android TV, and therefore you may watch films, but with limited functionality.  For example the “autoplay, and skip functions” will not work on Droids.  On your Android’s Html5 compatible browser, check out https://metrofilmfestival.com to get an idea of the great indie filmmakers that you may be sharing the Movies Plus channel with.
Okay, would you like to know more?  Movies Plus is new, and therefore we are growing to meet the requirements of broadcast platforms like Android TV, and the needs of filmmakers like you.  This is good for you, because this allows MP to offer you a place on our channel at no cost, and with no obligation to keep your Film/TV/Webisode with us.  You’ll get great exposure on the Movies Plus channel, as we are listed among the top 10 Apps in our Fire TV Category.
We leave the power of distribution in your hands.  You may stream your movie for a month to test the results…or let it broadcast for a longer period if you’d like greater exposure.  Your distribution strategy is controlled by you.
How do you participate?
If you like, we will host your movie for the first month for free on our CDN…Yes, space is limited!  OR you may choose to use your own host and therefore control your bandwidth costs, if any.  (Hosting on Vimeo/Youtube will NOT work with Roku or Fire TV.)  This is important to note: If you choose to host your content on your own domain or a free/cheap CDN service, then it frees you up to remove your film from Movies Plus at any time.  And it gives you the option to update what you screen on Movies Plus.
For example, you don’t have to screen your entire movie, you may first try screening a “featurette” of your movie, and then later on you might like to screen a Directors Cut.  Pilots and Screeners are also welcome.  Trailers and Teasers are not.  We encourage you to leverage Movies Plus in creative ways in order to set us apart from all those typical distributors and online venues who promise the world, but never deliver a penny to you.
About this “Leverage” stuff…
The Metro Film Festival and our channels like Movies Plus might sound a little unusual, so let’s look at an example of a movie currently streaming on MP.  The following image was taken from the feature film, The Tunnel.  This artcard was encoded into the start and end of their film, and it’s a good example of how filmmakers use Movies Plus to direct the audience to their website for purposes of promotion, publicity, sales, and all around marketing and distribution strategies.
example-artcard-b4-movie-plays-and-after
The filmmaker could also have elected to feature a “Donation, or Tip” button on their website or Point of Sale.  Or, filmmakers might also like to sell a T-Shirt or another Ancillary product rather than selling film “frames” or DVD’s.
We leave this up to you.  It’s wide open, there’s no obligation to strategize this way…but we welcome your ideas and we will try to help you monetize your content — if this is your goal.  Remember, you don’t have to prepare a special version like the above example, and you are not obligated in any way to motivate folks to visit your website.  (Maybe you just want to get your film seen — that’s cool.)
What does MP and the Metro Film Festival get out of this?
Well, right now we’re footing the bill, but in the future we hope to open the Metro Film Festival up to the public in much the same way that traditional film festivals monetize themselves.  And perhaps we’ll place adverts or sponsors on our broadcast Channels.  But in the meantime, we might just do a Kickstarter campaign to help pay our curator to keep up with submissions.
That’s about all for the moment, please contact Dean Lachiusa via http://www.Facebook.com/DeanLach to share your thoughts, and when you’re ready to submit your film then please email: curator@metrofilmfestival.com with a link to your video-preview or screener.
Cheers!
We hope you join us.

The Cure for common cold is related to baldness

Today – Newswired: Researchers have found a cure for the common cold, and it’s related to baldness in Men and Women.

Persis-Khambatta
It seems the cure has been related to the symptom called “scalpscratchyness.”  This is the nervous response of scratching one’s scalp in which many people experience when trying to find something interesting to watch on television.
The cure it seems, is in the hands of Indie Filmmakers who screen their films on a new channel sponsored by the Metro Film Festival.  The channel, called Movies Plus, is currently available for free on Amazon Fire TV devices, and coming soon to Roku.
“It’s truly a miracle” says Movies Plus founder Dean Lachiusa. “I collaborated with reknowned specialist Alfred E. Neuman of the agency Snap, Crackle and Pop…And they’ve come up with the statistics that prove that watching Movies Plus truly can cure the symptoms related to the common cold and baldness. It worked for me. And curiously enough, I lost 10 LBs of Prenatal weight too…”
Fact: It’s in the skin
Filmmakers have to have skin in the game in order to see results…A film/TV producer may screen their movie, TV, or webisode for free on the Movies Plus channel…the results are miraculous!”
Dean further says to “PM him on Facebook or email him at curator@metrofilmfestival.com for more information; or read the rest of this blurb:
Movies Plus is the place for Indie shows, and now is the time to take control of your project…don’t lose your film/show to a digital distributor who will never pay you!” (Did you know that most distributors commonly act as middle men, licensing your film to other sub-distributors who you do not have an agreement with. And these subdistributors might promise to split the ad-revenues with the distributor you originally sign with, but think about it…How many royalty splits can you have before you get nothing? Let’s do the math: 50% of zero is zero, carry the zero, times nothing, equals nothing!
Movies Plus is the only Broadcaster that allows you to control the amount of exposure for your movie or television program, and there’s no binding contract. We’ll stream your complete film, screener, pilot, or webisode. This in turn drives the audience to your website or point-of-sale. Typically a filmmakers website will feature several easy, do-it-yourself methods of monetization. Some filmmakers feature a PayPal Donation button, some offer a special DVD and they sell ancillary products like T-shirts.

It’s the perfect way to create publicity and leverage ones work without being tied to a distributor…Try us for a month or so, you can always move to a traditional distributor when/if you get the right offer.

Not by Persis Khambatta

 

 

Ed Burns distribution advice

The following is an excerpt from an article from filmmaker Ed Burns and Shohawk.com.
We start at the digital concentration, step #24.  The link to the entire article entitled “30 Tips: Making and Releasing Microbudget films!” is below.

  1. Embrace Your Strategy

We would not make excuses for our nontheatrical release. We would embrace it.”

512yk0rajdlDon’t treat your “small” release strategy as the equivalent of having a movie go straight to video in the 1990s. The climate is different now.

Embrace your means, use them to your advantage in promotion, and own your path to the audience. This will maximize productivity by focusing on what can work best for your film, not someone else’s.

  1. Festivals Are The Indie-Theatrical

I realized I could also have a theatrical release. It was called the festival circuit.”

The vast majority of films and filmmakers cannot afford a traditional theatrical run. But theatrical runs don’t conventionally serve to make a profit.

They are a means of promoting your film across the country or world in hopes that word will spread, people will later buy or rent the movie, and it will live on for a long time after.

Using festivals as your film’s theatrical run is a fairly inexpensive way to gain that exposure and propagate your film’s reputation in multiple markets. Instead of focusing on awards, use the festival circuit to create and connect with fans.

This point was heavily driven home in Jon Reiss’ game changing indie film distribution handbook, Think Outside The Box Office. Michael bought me this book for my birthday in 2011 and it changed my life.

  1. Utilize The Whole Internet

Marc and his team target tech bloggers, hip websites, tastemakers, and connectors to help create buzz on films lacking bigger marketing budgets and resources.”

There are companies dedicated to this, and you can do it with your small team. There’s more to promoting a film than posting on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Think of your movie’s key characters, plot-points, themes, and overall genre. What kinds of audiences are generally interested in such material? Where else do they spend their time? Are there specific blogs, forums, Reddit threads, or social groups they congregate at?

Using these online spaces to promote your film is a low-cost way to spread word; much like casting hungry young actors, these promotions are a mutually beneficial relationship: blogs, forums, and groups subsist on regular content. Make your film a part of that content stream.

Find the entire article here: http://shohawk.com/microbudgettips/

— Dean Lachiusa (curator for Movies Plus, a free Indie Film/TV distribution and broadcast channel on Amazon Fire TV and other connected TV platforms.)

Why competitors to Hulu may not pay you

Yes my filmmaking friend, DIY film Distribution platforms with big dollars behind them do sometimes fail.  BabelGum and Joost are long gone, and now so is Yekra.

Dean Lach

As filmmakers, we trust Hulu, but what about the others like Babelgum (now defunct), Joost (defunct) and others?  Like traditional distributors, Streaming video websites can be a risky business too.

The following is a REPOST from the Yekra FB page. Yekra was a self-distribution program that worked much like VHX and others. But as you see, they streamed indie films…they charged for the streams…but they apparently did not pay the filmmakers.

**Steven R. Ladd
July 15, 2015 at 8:50pm
Following up on my last post, [regarding YEKRA] perhaps all the filmmakers and others who had films on Yekra need to file a class action lawsuit naming the investors/owners in order to recover the money we earned. Shameful that there was no correspondence telling us how to get what we’ve earned. It’s like stealing, which is illegal.

Sonya Waterworth
Sonya Waterworth @Steven R. Ladd I would love to join your lawsuit. As a shareholder I still HAVE NO CLUE what is going on. The investors who shut down the business are a company called Bray Capital, owned by 2 men named Brady Collins and Seamus O’Brien.

Sonya Waterworth Also the Managers who deemed it ethical to behave in such a way before shutting the business down are a Patrick Fitzgerald, Bob Miller, and Kelly Summers.
**End of repost

Please note that I understand I’m not posting this to be negative towards Yekra or other similar svcs. (Note Yekra.com is defunct.)

** Here’s my shameless plug for a solution: My solution is quite different than Hulu and other streaming venues. Firstly, I’m not a online streaming “website.”  My channel, called Movies Plus is an actual TV channel that broadcasts through a Internet “set top box.” Movies Plus lets a filmmaker stream your film on our Fire TV, and soon on ROKU and other Connected TV platforms. With this solution, Movies Plus encourages the audience to visit your website so that they may support your movie via donations or DVD or ancillary product sales.  Here’s an example of what you would encode into the start/end of your Sneak-Peak, Screener or completed feature film or TV show:example-artcard-b4-movie-plays-and-after

The Tunnel is an Indie made feature film.  This is a perfect artcard example. This is how a filmmaker should prepare their movie for broadcast on Movies Plus. Place this at the start/end of your film/TV program. Remember you don’t have to screen your entire project, you may prepare a Pilot or a Featurette that drives the audience to your Point-of-sale website where you offer incentives for the audience who supports you.  Things like DVD’s, T-shirts, and other Ancillary products. Plus don’t forget a Donation box from Paypal or whatever.  If you interested in Movies Plus, please see me on my Facebook page and I’ll send you more information.

Filmmakers want to get paid!

I realize that you actually haven’t asked for some of the insight that I offer up. I’m sorry, I guess it’s just the do-gooder in me that wants to support the indie filmmaker.
So, here goes another blurb:
While watching TV; have you ever noticed that a commercial like the Ginsu knives display a dotcom that points to a particular page on their website? For example, instead of saying “visit Ginsu.dotcom,” the advert instead says to visit…Ginsu.dotcom/62.
And as it so happens…you’re watching channel 62.
That’s the kind of thing I propose to Movies Plus filmmakers. Put a dotcom on your video that directs people to a particular page that sells a T-shirt, or features a video with a donation button, etc etc.
This way, you can track your progress on Movies Plus. A filmmaker will look at their CDN stats and see their movie has been downloaded say…5,000 times via MP. Then they look at their hits on the dotcom, and the activity that is generated by the MP visitor. The activity might be anything from sales to donations to clicking on other videos and browsing the site.
So there you have it, the method that I propose to filmmakers on Movies Plus. AND I’d like to suggest this method could be used on one of my ROKU channels or other Apps.
Recently someone asked why they should use Movies Plus…how do they get paid?
A: Because you control the sale of your film and ancillary products directly from your website.
The complete blurb:
If you never signed with a distributor these days, then perhaps you should speak with folks who have. It’s typical for distributors to license movies to subdistributors. Well that might sound like a great idea because you, as a hustling, bustling filmmaker imagine that the more distribution points you have…the more money you will make.
Haa! Imagine a pyramid scheme or perhaps you’ve heard the term “multi-leve marketing.” How many times can a commission be cut? In other words, if a distributor promises you 50% from a sale, and he then licenses your movie to sub-dist who promises the same and then that sub-dist uses a aggregator or company like CinemaNow, or Netflix who promises 50%…what does that leave you?
Think about it…because you don’t make your money from that Point of Sale (hulu/CinemaNow, etc.) Oh no…you signed a deal that says you’re splitting the mula with your distributor, who bye the way is merely circulating your one-sheets, and YOUR content to many others just waiting to deliver your content on Connected TV, Set top boxes and numerous online broadcast venues that ARE NOT tracked by Nielson or other analytics you are privy too. Nope, you’re only privy to the stats that your distributor has, and besides very few folks can read metric data and understand them anyway.
Add Movies Plus for free on the Amazon store or directly from your Fire TV.

http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Pie-Films-Movies-Plus/dp/B013MBOC4S/ref=sr_1_1?s=mobile-apps&ie=UTF8&qid=1449873117&sr=1-1
From Fire TV: On the left menu, scroll down to APPS. Then scroll down to Category. Then go to NOVELTY. We’re listed 3rd or 4rth on the list. Add us for FREE…USE us for FREE.